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How to Deepen Your Worldbuilding

A Writer's Path

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By Cecilia Lewis

Setting and worldbuilding are critical aspects of your novel. Having a vivid setting can pull readers into your story and bring it to life, and unique worldbuilding is often what sets a book apart. In editing both my clients’ books and my own, I find that establishing the setting is an underdeveloped or underused skill for many writers. I often work with my clients to strengthen the setting details in their works, and I also work consciously on establishing the setting and worldbuilding in my own writing.

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The story behind the Treaty of Waitangi

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I love his thinking on this and wish I could help somehow. I’d take a measly $250,000 for the preliminary work before Matthew picked up the treaty. It makes one wonder how much of that 7 mil is for bribes. Maybe they bought the building and the moving company?

Matthew Wright

It’s Waitangi Day in New Zealand, the 176th anniversary of the day when a treaty was signed at Waitangi, in the Bay of Islands, between Maori and the British government. It’s widely regarded as modern New Zealand’s founding document. And I figured out a way to make the best hourly rate ever from what the government’s planning for the original parchment.

More on that in a moment, but first here’s a history of that parchment. There are many copies of the Treaty, made at the time so it could be hawked around the country after the formal signing. But for practical purposes “the” Treaty document is the one signed on 6 February at Waitangi. It symbolises all the Treaty scrolls and – because it marks the foundation of Crown government – is the New Zealand equivalent in importance of the US Declaration of Independence. The physical scroll is the most…

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Gallery

St Augustine with Friends

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Life Unscripted

A couple months ago we made our first quick trip to Saint Augustine since the mid 80’s (I guess).  See what I did?  It feels that way…  As if we’ve been here for months — when it’s barely been 30 days!  I’m not sure what that says about Florida, or our attitude towards Florida?  I can’t exactly say that time is dragging — just that it feels as if we’ve been here a long time.

I have been noticing this as a repeating phenomenon.  Time has changed (our perception of it, anyway) since we retired/went RV’ing.  Considering that we retired AND went mobile in close proximity to each other I’m not sure which might be the cause.

I don’t mind that days of the week took on less importance. When I drove truck back in the 80’s I lived on a 70 hour week and one day didn’t matter from the…

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3 Ways Endever Will Differ From Other Publishers

adoptingjames

I’ve been talking a lot about how my publishing company, Endever, will stand apart from traditional publishing houses. I’ve started a blog that will walk you through the journey of getting it up and running. I encourage you to click on the link below to take you to it and watch the five-minute video about three keynote ways Endever plans to change the way publishing is done.

Click here to watch the video on Endever’s blog. 

If you’re unable to watch the video, I’ve listed three of our notable operating procedures here:

  1. When it’s time for us to accept manuscript submissions, we will ask that you send in a 3-5 minute video pitching your book idea to us. No more querying or faceless book proposals. We want to experience the spirit and the passion behind the book.
  2. Once we take on your book, we will assign a dedicated team to…

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SEPT 4, ’14 HERE IS A U-TUBE I WOULD LIKE FOR YOU TO WATCH & MORE!!

Sympathy flows for those with an obvious illness–a broken arm, lots of stitches or a missing limb. Yet there are a number of illnesses that you can’t see on the outside and people are less tolerant of the problems that go with them. Telling someone to ‘tough it out’ is not always the best answer. Often they simply want someone to listen, even if they’ve heard you whine about the same thing ten times before.

sondasmcschatter

SEPT 4, ’14 HERE IS A U-TUBE I WOULD LIKE FOR YOU TO WATCH & MORE!!

Invisible Illness and Incommunicable Diseases: Emily Reach White at TEDxGreenville

Published on May 1, 2013

Emily watched in silence and shame as her dad struggled with Chronic Lyme Disease for over ten years. After his death in 2007, she began to question: What makes some diseases more culturally visible, and more culturally acceptable, than others? In her talk, she explains that not all diseases are created equal and how narrative medicine can help right these inequalities.

PERSON

SONDA SCAN REDONE

CANARY

MED REASONS

PEOPLE KNEW

CARD FRONT

CARD BACK

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SHARE YOUR STORY—— EDUCATE— INFORM— & HOPE IT FALLS ON OPEN MINDS!!!!!! 

PEOPLE SICK

stop-door-signfor-medical-reasons

AWARE

DRAMA

SHARE YOUR STORY— SHARE YOUR HOPE—-

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LATER GATORS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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How to Write Battle Scenes

I’m not planning on writing any war stories, but I figure I can still pick some things from this for the battles my characters have with one another.

A Writer's Path

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In my experience, writing battle scenes is a very dangerous endeavor. A writer has to walk a fine line between giving too much away and giving too little. While this is true of writing in general, it is especially true of combat.

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Writers: Are You Rushing?

The only rushing I do is to get an article ready for The Greenwood Magazine. My novel writing is super slow. I’m certain when Cindy returns my edited manuscript, I’ll be kicking myself that I don’t have the next one ready for her.

adoptingjames

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I want to thank Joey B. for raising this issue in one of my previous posts about what to do with an idea for a story. His website is InStagnation. So, thanks Joey!

His comment was:

I’ve been trying to make stories out of ideas throughout the years and somehow I can’t finish because I’m trying to rush everything.

I want to be the wise sage and offer pearls of wisdom about slowing down and taking time to sniff the ink pen along the way and blah, blah, blah…

But I can’t. I can’t because I too rush like Chris Hemsworth. Is that a good thing? Is that a bad thing?

Or is it just stupid?

My wife is always telling me my greatest downfall is rushing my writing. And she’s right. I miss plot holes, grammatical errors, I number the pages wrong, and on and on.

But…

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