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Finally! The Real Truth About Queries

June 20, 2017

I think I saved this post more for the cartoon than the writing advice! As you may have noticed it’s 2 years old. I decided to share it before deleting it. Don’t think the advice is bad; it’s simply that I have several newer articles with the same advice. I did save the cartoon. I plan to print it and hang it where I can see it as I work. 🙂 ~ Connie

adoptingjames

Snoopy 2

Query. It’s the big F-word in the writer’s vocabulary.

It’s the ultimate eye-roll in the agent’s life.

Queries. They’re like taxes. A seemingly giant waste of time, but completely necessary to keep the world going round.

Writers don’t like queries because they take away from valuable writing time and it’s basically an email (or letter) that might as well just say:

PLEASE RESPOND TO THIS MESSAGE WITH A TOTALLY UNNECESSARY REJECTION LETTER TO BRIGHTEN MY DAY!!!!(insert: smiley face, smiley face, toothy smiley face)

Because apparently that’s what all agents read while glazing over your query letter while snickering and sharpening the spear on the end of their tail, right?

I’ve been writing queries for many years now and I’ve learned a few things not to do, and, having spoken with many agents, I’ve also gained insight on what they think about queries.

This post is to share thoughts on both…

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4 Comments
  1. Ah, yes, the query. The auto-rejections are what get to me – the ones that arrive one second after hitting send.

    • I self-published my first book so I haven’t gotten a rejection yet. I didn’t know they would come so fast. When it happens to me now I won’t feel so bad.

      • I was traditionally published, and after 6 books, I canceled all my contracts and self-published. I haven’t regretted the decision for one tiny second. I wouldn’t turn down a contract with a big publishing house, but I am very wary of surrendering so much control again. Give it a go, but there is nothing wrong with being an indie author if you end up going that route. 🙂

  2. It’s not that there’s anything wrong with being an indie author, it’s that I don’t like being screwed. Probably another indie publisher wouldn’t print the book in a 9-font just to get $200 to correct “my” mistake. I guess I’m afraid to trust any of them after that. I have checked out another publisher near me and they have much better pricing than the one I used. I’m considering them, but I think I’d still like to try a brick-and-morter publisher somewhere along the line.

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